Sunday, 12 February 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 11: Knotted Satin Stitch

Welcome to another new stitch, the Knotted Satin Stitch. It was made known to me by CrazyQstitcher who found it in Anchor's book on Crewel Embroidery.

The knots are hidden behind the Satin stitches and lift the stitches a bit at the bottom edge.

Knotted Satin Stitch is worked like this:

Take the needle out at 1, make a straight vertical stitch 2-3 and loop the thread over and under the needle.

 Continue in the same way.

This is how the stitches look on my Aida sampler.


Homework. 
Make something 'Crewel' with this pattern and the Knotted Satin Stitch, and turn it into a greeting card.







16 comments:

  1. You find such interesting, unusual stitches!

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    1. And I have found that it is NOT an easy stitch!

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  2. not come accross satin stitch with a knot before will work well on your greeting card

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    1. It is a stitch with an attitude, strong will and will not be old what to do!!!!

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  3. Queenie, I think the problem was using Aida for the work. Try it on plain cloth. I just re-tried it on muslin/calico and it behaves nicely.

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    1. It behaved better on the Aida sampler than it does on the plain fabric for the greeting card. I think the problem might be the curved lines or the two strands of DMC floss I am using. I will experiment with wool yarn on wool and pearl on even weave to see what happens. LOTS of homework!!!

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  4. It's look like knotted buttonhole,(large knotted butttonhole?)
    Is there a difference ?
    Thank you
    Mattia

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    1. Thank you for your question, Mattia,
      I have done some research and find that there are several different stitches that are a combination of the Buttonhole (or Satin) stitch and a loop or a knot.
      The Top Knotted Blanket stitch, the knot sits at the top.
      Tailor's Buttonhole stitch is worked so the knots form a strong edge (for a hard wearing buttonhole).
      In Totsuka'ss embroidery dictionary, there is a variation called Chain Darning stitch, which is very similar to the Knotted Satin stitch but the needle bites the fabric at uneven levels.
      In the Stitch Dictionary at Pintangle, there are two TAST stitches:
      Knotted Buttonhole stitch, where two arms are tied together with a knot.
      Fancy Bobbin Edging the knot is a loop over the leg.
      Then there are the Buttonhole Picot stitches...
      I hope to have some pictures of the variations when I present my homework on Friday.

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  5. I love this stitch! and also the drawing for the greeting card.

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    1. It appears lovely, but is a tricky stitch to get even.

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  6. Interesting stitch. I am excited about learning another stitch.

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    1. I just read Annex's comment (see below) that it resembles the Rope Stitch. You will probably also feel that you have done this before, but at a different angle.

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  7. Somehow this stitch looked familiar, so I just had to try and find it in one of my embroidery books. I found it in Marion Nichols Encyclopedia of Embroidery Stitches, were it's also called rope stitch. I never stitched it in this angle, it's quite a different look. Someday I give t it a try. I'm sure your design will look pretty in this stitch!

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    1. Yes, to me it felt familiar, but I am sure I have never used it before. Aha, the Rope stitch, yes, you are right, it is the Rope stitch worked at a different angle. It behaves better as a RS than the BSS, the 'knots' are actually just loops and move a long the leg it is looped around. The key seems to keep the stitches really close and crowded.
      Thank you for the information, Annet. You do know your stitches!

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  8. I can't wait to see what you're going to do with this new stitch on your greeting card design.

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    1. It was hard to use only Knotted Satin stitch, which turned out to be a rebellious stitch, so I have added other stitches, too.

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